Which cards can you split in blackjack?

Blackjack is one of the most popular casino games around. It is a simple game of beat the dealer and is often referred to as 21. It is considered one of the most skillful casino games and requires strategy, skill, and luck. One of the most important decisions a blackjack player must make is whether to split their cards. Knowing which cards can be split and when is a key part of playing the game successfully.

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What is splitting in Blackjack?

Splitting in blackjack is when a player has two cards of the same value and chooses to separate them into two separate hands. After splitting, the player must make a second bet equal to the first bet and then play each hand separately.

Why Split in Blackjack?

Splitting in blackjack is done for two main reasons. The first is to increase the chance of a win. When you split two same-value cards, you are essentially creating two hands with a higher chance of winning than one hand. The second reason is to maximize winnings. By splitting your cards, you can double your bet and potentially win more money in the long run.

Which Cards Can You Split in Blackjack?

The most common cards that can be split in blackjack are pairs of 8s, Aces, and face cards. It is important to note that in some casinos, you can only split Aces once, meaning you can only have two hands with one Ace each.

When to Split in Blackjack

The decision to split in blackjack should not be taken lightly. There are certain situations where splitting is recommended, and other times when it is not.

When to Split

  • Pairs of 8s – It is recommended to always split pairs of 8s, regardless of the dealer’s up card.
  • Pairs of Aces – It is recommended to always split pairs of Aces, regardless of the dealer’s up card.
  • Pairs of Face Cards – It is recommended to only split pairs of face cards if the dealer’s up card is an Ace, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6.
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When Not to Split

  • Pairs of 2s and 3s – It is not recommended to split pairs of 2s and 3s, regardless of the dealer’s up card.
  • Pairs of 4s, 5s, and 10s – It is not recommended to split pairs of 4s, 5s, and 10s, regardless of the dealer’s up card.
  • Pairs of 6s and 7s – It is not recommended to split pairs of 6s and 7s unless the dealer’s up card is an Ace, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6.

Splitting in Multi-Deck Blackjack

In multi-deck blackjack, the splitting rules are slightly different. It is still recommended to always split 8s, Aces, and face cards, but the other pairs are handled differently.

  • Pairs of 2s and 3s – It is not recommended to split pairs of 2s and 3s, regardless of the dealer’s up card.
  • Pairs of 4s – It is recommended to only split pairs of 4s if the dealer’s up card is a 5 or 6.
  • Pairs of 5s – It is recommended to always split pairs of 5s, regardless of the dealer’s up card.
  • Pairs of 6s and 7s – It is recommended to only split pairs of 6s and 7s if the dealer’s up card is an Ace, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6.
  • Pairs of 10s – It is not recommended to split pairs of 10s, regardless of the dealer’s up card.

Splitting Pairs in Online Blackjack

In online blackjack, the rules for splitting pairs are the same as in a live casino. However, there are some advantages to playing online. For one, most online casinos allow players to split more than once, meaning you can split your cards up to three times. This can be a great way to maximize winnings.

Conclusion

Splitting your cards in blackjack is a great way to increase your chances of winning and maximize your winnings. Knowing which cards can be split and when is an important part of playing the game successfully. It is important to remember that the rules for splitting pairs in multi-deck blackjack and online blackjack are slightly different.

By understanding the splitting rules and when to split, players can make smarter decisions at the blackjack table and increase their chances of success.

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